New app highlights gender bias in recruitment

Gender bias within the hiring process is an issue which has received much publicity of late. But does this increased attention necessarily mean that the problem is improving?

Software Developer, Mauro Vanetti, decided to shed light on the growing issue of gender stereotyping in a decidedly unique way, creating a video game which highlights sexist hiring practices.

The game, entitled Two Interviewees, is a narrative video which aims to spread awareness about recruitment discrimination. As the player, you watch the interview from over the shoulder of the HR Recruiter, interviewing two candidates, one male and one female. Both applicants have identical CVs, backgrounds and answers. However, the recruiter perceives each of them completely differently based purely on their gender.

For example, the recruiter asks the candidates how they see themselves, giving the player three responses to choose from: “As a competent, ambitious professional”, “A discreet and diligent person”, or “What do you mean, I don’t get it?”

If the player selects, “As a competent, ambitious professional”, the note beneath the man will read “resolute”, whereas the woman’s read “arrogant”.

Similarly, when asked where they saw themselves in the future, the candidates respond: “With an established career and a family.” The male candidate is then describing as possessing a “strong work ethic”, whilst the woman’s character flashes “pregnancy alert”.

The game also shows how differing sexualities and races are discriminated against during interviews, as well as salary expectations and personal style.

The game is free to download from Google Play.

While the scenario may seem farfetched to some, there are cases when recruiters have been caught being sexist. For example, a CEO at an UK based pharmaceutical company was found guilty of sexual discrimination in November after it was revealed that he had written sexist comments on a female candidate's job application. On the note it was scrawled: “Red lipstick, heels, good; tattoos, do not approve; wearing a dress, excellent.”

Comments (1)
Fri, 26 Feb 2016 1:31pm GMT
My organisation is 70% female, so I am fighting this kind of gender stereotyping all the time....
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