One fifth of employees to seek new job in 2016

21% of workers plan to look for new jobs in 2016, according to a new study.

The report, commissioned by Penna, has found that a staggering 21% of employees are set on looking for a new job in the upcoming year. Additionally, the study reveals that the majority of them have been considering a change for as a long as 11 months.

According to the study, 48% of people asked claimed the main reason for the change was that they were searching for better pay and benefits. 44% said it was down to the promise of greater development opportunities, whilst 32% were simply looking for a change in career direction.

Bev White, Managing Director of Penna Career Services explained the results of the report: “We all know that the end of the year sees a spike in the number of individuals looking to take charge of their careers. Worryingly, it would appear that potentially many employees have been disengaged for over 11 months.

“Employers have the power to re-engage disenchanted workers and there is no better time to trigger important changes than at the start of a new year when thoughts generally turn to themes of refresh and renewal. While offering better pay and benefits may be out of the hands of some employers, a lot of the things on employees’ wish lists such as better work-life balance, greater recognition and development opportunities don’t cost anything.”

The survey interviewed over 1,000 employees, and found that those aged 18-24 were the most likely to be planning a move this year, whilst 25% of those aged 25-34 are considering leaving their posts.

“Our research shows that career development is particularly important to workers and one of the most impactful steps that companies can take is to make sure managers are holding regular career conversations with direct reports to identify personal goals and challenges,” continued White.

“Such discussions create more agile employees and empower them to better contribute to company success. They also open up opportunities for redeployment, where individuals are uninspired by their current role but remain committed to the organisation.”

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