Vacancies rise at fastest pace in 16 years

Demand for staff has risen at the fastest pace since 1998, according to a new report from KPMG and Recruitment & Employment Confederation.

But as vacancies strongly increases both permanent and temporary staff, with rates of growth the strongest since March 1998 and May 1998 respectively, some experts have warned that the job market remains threatened by a skills shortage.

“More and more firms have established links with schools and colleges and some provide work experience for young people which will help to bridge the skills gap for the future,” commented Marc Zao-Sanders, Managing Director of Filtered and Founder of the charity, accessprofessions.com,
“But not enough is being done by either businesses or the Government to skill up everyone else now.”

The Report on Jobs Vacancy Index posted the highest reading in over 16 years, reaching 68.2 in August, up from 68.0 in July.

“This latest report is one of many confirming that UK businesses across a range of industries are suffering skills shortages, Zao-Sanders told Recruitment Grapevine.

“Ready and willing to contribute, it is the millions of graduates, working professionals and unemployed who, with the right training, can really help close the skills gap and boost the UK economy for the long term,” he said in response to reports that the Government is under increasing pressure to reform the visa system.

“The impact of visa reforms are likely to be minor and temporary, so it is imperative that we improve and utilise our significant existing workforce,” he added.

“Unless businesses - ideally supported by the government - step up their investment in high-quality training, the economy will ultimately suffer and our reputation as a destination for the world's most talented workers will diminish."

 Image courtesy of Flickr user Julie Walraven

Comments (1)
Tue, 16 Sep 2014 2:10pm BST
Sean Durrant
This is a "problem" that has been growing for as long as I can remember and is one of the (many) key reasons why companies turn to a Recruitment Agency.

Sean Durrant
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